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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but there is an international effort under way to work on a cease-fire. egypt has been taking the lead role, and today the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what k
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
to be lifted. a few sticking points raised with that one. >> what does the role that egypt played mean for egypt and the region going forward? >> reporter: egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all of this. secretary of state clinton calling it a cornerstone of stability in the region. and i think the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recently elected islamist government would handle a situation like this. they did seem to strike a balance between appeasing their muslim brotherhood supporters who wanted them to talk tough with israel while making sure there's no chance of jeopardy jeopardizing that 32-year-old peace treaty with israel and, of course, the $1.5 billion in u.s. annual aid that comes attached to that treaty. >> clarissa ward thank you. >>> we now go to margaret brennan in washington where she is learning more about the united states' role in the cease fire deal. >> good morning to you charlie, and to gayle. u.s. and israeli officials say u.s. president obama sealed the deal with benjamin netanyahu but hillary clinton deliv
and weapons from egypt were also targeted. they did the same thing in the invasion four years ago but hamas was back in business in short order. the tunisian foreign minister arrived amid the chaos to visit a hospital and show solidarity. this follows one yesterday by the eegyptian prime minister. egypt is willing and working to promote a cease-fire. the israelis insist everything is hamas' fault. >> we are only interested in one thing, not capturing territory, not in military victory on the battlefield, we want to bring peace and quiet. >> the israeli troops and arm or continue to amass along the border and roads are sealed off and the israeli cabinet approved plans to call up as much as 71 a,000 reservists, setting the stage for a possible ground invasion. he had to the israeli military deployed a battery of so-called iron dome antimissile system right here in tel aviv four are already operational in the south and the idea is they intercept, detect, and intercept missiles in the air and such is the success rate that three more have been rushed into production anthon
. the trip was officially to lend world support to hamas, which egypt's government supports but he was accompanied by officials involved in brokering a truce in the last gaza fighting in hopes of do iing the same again. sophisticated anti-missile defense system that includes both israeli developed revelry. some got through. this family was surveying the damage of their home when fear of another attack sent every one scurrying for shelter. with at least a dozen casualties in gaza, including six children repo reported so far. the three-hour egyptian mission had little to offer in way of immediate hope for either side. calling the fighting a tragedy and said he would spare no effort to achieve a truce. the next diplomatic effort will be tuesday when u.n. secretary general ban ki moon arrives. between now and then, there may be a lot more they have to negotiate if he wants a cease fire, never mind a truce, in this battle. i'm allen pizzey on the israeli/gaza border. >> george mitchell, former united states special envoy, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> this clash and the exchange of
on the hill this week. margaret brennan, cbs news, washington. >>> in egypt, a rally by supporters of president mohamed morsi has been cancelled. overnight anti-government protesters clashed with police in cairo's tahrir square. they plan to press ahead with the demonstration today, demanding that morsi relent on his seizure of near absolute authority. he said the edict was temporary and only granted him limited authority. holly williams is in cairo. do we have any indication of what the president there is going to do? is he going to back down? >> good morning. well, president mohamed morsi is clearly trying to persuade people that he doesn't want to be a dictator. he met with a group of senior egyptian judges and he told them that his new immunity of the courts would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem with that is we don't know exactly what it means and it certainly won't be enough to satisfy his opponents. in fact, one of those judges described it as a frail statement. for president morsi's critics, they are still extremely angry about the series of decrees that he issu
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)